Last edited by Fenrilar
Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

9 edition of African American religious culture found in the catalog.

African American religious culture

  • 134 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by ABC-CLIO in Santa Barbara, Calif .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Blacks -- America -- Religion -- Encyclopedias

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementAnthony B. Pinn, general editor ; Stephen C. Finley, associate editor ; Torin Alexander, assistant editors ... [et al.].
    GenreEncyclopedias
    ContributionsPinn, Anthony B., Finley, Stephen C., Alexander, Torin.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBL2500 .A37 2009
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23202663M
    ISBN 101576074706, 1576075125
    LC Control Number2009013494

    The roots of African American religious culture extend between Africa and the United States through the Trans-Atlantic slave trade that occurred during the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries. Religion was a reaction to the harsh conditions of slavery and an escape from the abuses of human. trade. Christianity in African American Culture There are so many views on how the African American community joined a massive movement called, “Christianity”. This religion has been a key role in the lives of the African-American since being bought over to America from the motherland of Africa.

    Slavery and African American Religion. Sources. Christianization. One of the most important developments in African American culture in this era was the spread of Christianity within both the slave and free black communities. In the Southern colonies, where most American slaves lived, Anglican missionaries led the way. Religion and spirituality has always played an important role within African-American communities. Considerable attention has already been given to the role of Christianity and Islam as religious influences, but the diversity of religious traditions practiced within the African-American community extends beyond those two traditions.

    African-American dance, like other aspects of African-American culture, finds its earliest roots in the dances of the hundreds of African ethnic groups that made up African slaves in the Americas as well as influences from European sources in the United in the African tradition, and thus in the tradition of slaves, was a part of both everyday life and special occasions. In addition, there are elements of indigenous religion in African cultural practices. As a result, Africans still feel a significant influence from traditional African cosmologies and beliefs. At the end of the 20th century, Muslims worshiped throughout much of the continent.


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African American religious culture Download PDF EPUB FB2

African American Religious Cultures is a potential rival to the Encyclopedia of African and African American Religions (). The first part of the set is made up of A–Z entries, and the second part contains essays covering broader-based themes.

The average A–Z entry in part 1 is six pages long, with a two- to five-source : $ Albert J. Raboteau is American's foremost expert on the history of African American religion. In this text, "African-American Religion," which is part of the larger "Religion in American Life" series, Raboteau offers an engaging panorama of how religion (of all types, not just Christianity) impacted African Americans and how their religion impacted America/5(6).

Books for the Entire Family Celebrating the Faith and Culture of the African-American Christian Community Teleion Books is a new Christian publishing house committed to producing high-quality fiction, non-fiction, and children’s books that celebrate the faith and culture of the African-American Christian community.

In addition to culturally inclusive teaching materials Black books are part of virtually every literary course. Black history month encourages the examination of the significant contributions made by African American authors. Black children now feel part of learning. African American Christian books validate this unique way of celebrating faith.

African American Religion brings together in one forum the most important essays on the development of these traditions to provide an overview of the field. DOI link for African-American Religion. African-American Religion book.

Interpretive Essays in History and Culture. AFRICAN-AMERICAN RELIGIOUS CULTURE. chapter 17 | 24 pagesCited by: Books of interest to African Americans and people of color.

Most are from a Christian perspective - biographies, devotionals, Bibles, children's books, urban christian fiction. Over twelve million Africans were abducted and forced into slavery in the Americas. Of these, approximately 20 percent were Muslims.

A significant minority were also Christians, hailing from the Kongo Kingdom in West Central Africa, which adopted Catholicism as its official cult Cited by: 1.

DOI link for African-American Religion. African-American Religion book. Interpretive Essays in History and Culture. African-American Religion. DOI link for African-American Religion. An African cultural heritage, widely shared by the people imported into any new colony, will have to be defined in less concrete terms, by focusing more on Cited by:   African-American Religion book.

Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. How is the religious experience of African Americans different f /5. Since the earliest days of slavery, African Americans have called on their religious faith in the struggle against oppression.

In this book the Beatitudes — from Jesus’ famous Sermon on the Mount — form the backdrop for Carole Boston Weatherford’s powerful free-verse poem that traces the African American journey from slavery to civil.

“The African American Bible: Bound in a Christian Nation,” Journal of Biblical Literatureno. 1 (Winter ):DOI: /jbl Book Reviews Review of Rufus Burrow, Jr.’s A Child Shall Lead Them: Martin Luther King Jr., Young People, and the Movement, Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology Entertainment Culture & Arts Media Celebrity TV & Film.

Huffington Post BlackVoices has compiled an extensive book list, featuring a range of genres including fiction, non-fiction, poetry, science-fiction and the autobiography.

50 Books That Every African American Should : Patrice Peck. scholarship on African American life and religious consciousness in the South. It is not intended to be a definitive statement. Rather, it seeks to make a contribution to the ongoing scholarly efforts to gain greater insight to African American religion and culture, particularly as.

Exploring such topics as "whiteness" as seen through a black man's eye, modernism and postmodernism in black culture, and the emancipating role of black music from the plantation to the ghetto, Open Mike is a perfect introduction to Dyson's work and a must-have for students and scholars in African American Studies and Cultural Studies.

Religious Elements in African American Magic,” in Religion and American Culture 7, no. 2, Summer © by the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture. Reprinted by permission of the University of California Press. Library of Congress Cataloging-in. Kwanzaa is an African American holiday that celebrated by millions within the African American community.

Developed in during the Black Freedom movement, this holiday is celebrated from December 26th to January 1st. The name is derived from Swahili meaning “first fruits”. African Bookstore We are pleased to provide books on the African experience world wide, as well as books on the African American experience from your favorite African American.

conversions of the indigenous people, mainly, from African Traditional Religion (ATR) to the two mission religions. The religious beliefs, practices and the provision of social services of these immigrant religions have impacted on the religious and cultural life of the traditional communities.

African-American religions and religious beliefs spring from this community's history of oppression as well as its African roots. History Africans captured and brought to America were able to hold on to some of the religious practices common to their native land. Throughout African-American history, religion has been indelibly intertwined with the fight against intolerance and racial prejudice.

Martin Luther King, Jr.-America's best-known champion of civil liberties-was a Baptist minister. African American expressions of faith, Christian gifts and home decor for the African American family. Hear about sales, receive special offers & more. You can unsubscribe at any time.Idang African culture and values.

procedures, food processing or greeting patterns) is related to the whole system. It is. in this respect that we can see that even a people’s technology is part of their by:   Reviews “Judith Weisenfeld’s Hollywood Be Thy Name is a generative, well researched study of filmic representations of African Americans, black religious customs, and ideas about race in America Weisenfeld raises important questions about the medium of film, its engagement with, and shaping of, notions of race and culture in the United States.